Are Machines Stealing Your Job?

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machine-content-teams

Three myths about artificial intelligence and its impact on content creators.

Industrialization is transforming our information economy, destroying old business models and creating new opportunities. The impact it will have on content professionals will make social media seem tame in comparison.

The Industrialization of the Internet

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industrial-revolution-landscape

The industrialization of the internet is driven by the relentless pursuit of productivity advantages, not quality improvements.

“The digital revolution is probably going to be as important and transformative as the industrial revolution.” — Ryan Avent, The Economist columnist, author of The Wealth of Humans (via The Atlantic).

The History of the Semantic Web is the Future of Intelligent Assistants

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semantic-web-assistants

The Semantic Web provides an enticing vision of our online future. This next-generation Web will enable intelligent computer assistants to work autonomously on our behalf: scheduling our appointments, doing our shopping, finding the information we need, and connecting us with like-minded individuals.

Goodbye .@, Hello Messaging?

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A single-character change in how tweets are distributed highlights a massive strategic decision for Twitter.

When I first started using Twitter, I’d start my tweets with the names of other users. I wanted to give them credit for their ideas. I later discovered very few people even saw my tweets because of how they were composed.

Content curation is disrupting content creation. Are content marketers moving fast enough?

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First published on LinkedIn.

A few weeks ago, I made the trip down to Content Marketing World, “the largest content marketing event on the planet” with over 2600 delegates representing 50 countries.

I wanted to explore how the activity of content curation—the process of collecting, organizing and displaying information relevant to a particular area of interest—was impacting this massive content marketing industry.

A Visual History of The Next Big Thing (and how to see The Next One coming)

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First published on Medium.com.

In business, vision isn’t some mythical ability to see the future. It’s about being able to recognize a pattern and apply it to something new, before others see it coming.

In this post, we’ll introduce you to one such pattern, the gestation of new media within old media.

Big data’s creative and empathetic sibling (and why they struggle to get along)

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Joyce Hostyn argues that Better Human Understanding, Not Big Data, Is the Future of Business. Some excerpts (with my emphasis):

Despite the best of intentions, we’re not data driven, we’re hypothesis driven. Our stories (our mental models) are merely hypotheses of how the world works.

Confessions of a Twitter Bot

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Bots have a bad reputation. Whether they’re sinister botnets, carrying out coordinated attacks, or annoying spambots, polluting our digital universe with crappy auto-generated content, bots are a much maligned bunch.

You might ask, if bots are bad and a huge portion of Twitter activity is already generated by bots, Why is Primal creating another one?

Trixie’s Story: Virtual Assistants and Interest Graphs

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I was meeting with two guys, one a technologist, one a business advisor.

The discussion was focused on Primal’s technology: semantic user models, knowledge representation, yada, yada…

The business advisor, having listened patiently for some time, finally interjects, “Tell me what this means to Trixie!”

“Trixie?”

“Yes, the everyday person.

Why The "Star Trek Computer" Needs Open Data…And Scotty, Too

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Scotty

Do you share this opinion?

So given that, what can we say about the eventual development of something we can call “The Star Trek Computer”? Right now, I’d say that we can say at least two things: It will be Open Source , and licensed under the Apache Software License v2.