Posts Tagged ‘personalization’

Automated Content Curation Your Readers Will Love: A WordPress Plugin That Uses Your Interest Graph

Monday, September 19th, 2016

Engage your readers with great content that expresses your interests!

Primal for WordPress uses Primal’s powerful interest graph and content filtering technology to give your readers relevant and timely content that’s tailored to each individual page you create.

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There’s a Graph for That!

Tuesday, December 3rd, 2013

According to Murthy Nukala, “any marketer who doesn’t have a graph within the next twelve months will be at a permanent competitive disadvantage.” That’s a pretty ominous warning, particularly when most marketers have no idea what a graph is, let alone how to use it.

coloured-lines

Graphs are a useful way to represent relationships between things. And the World Wide Web is called a Web for a reason: it is a huge network composed of pieces of content and links among them. So it isn’t surprising that graphs are being used everywhere in IT these days to represent particular kinds of relationships among types of content living on the Web.

Since every kind of relationship among things on the Web seems to have its own graph, it can get a little confusing keeping them all straight. That also makes it hard to determine which of those many graphs could be important to you and your business.

You might find it all befuddling enough to develop graphophobia and just ignore them all. That would be a shame, because leveraging these mysterious graphs could truly revolutionize your business.
Here I’ll connect some of the dots and help you understand what graphs are and why they are important. (more…)

User Modeling for Personalized Content Services

Tuesday, August 27th, 2013

usermodel

Developers have long created software that customers use directly. But now, we’re creating solutions that incorporate internal representations of end-users and adapt to individual needs.

In this post, we’re going to introduce you to the most important component in your solution stack, the user model, explain why it’s so important, and show you how to incorporate user modeling into your solution.

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How to Tell If Your Recommender Will Fail (Before You Spend All That Money On It)

Wednesday, July 10th, 2013

Awhile back, we started exploring how individual interest graphs, powered by Primal’s data service, can be used to improve the performance of recommendation engines.

recommender-fail

Our surprising conclusion: Marketers and technology buyers are sold on the promise of personalized recommendations. Unfortunately, they don’t know how to tell recommenders apart, even when they’re built on radically different technical approaches. And the results are mixed, at best. End users are left frustrated, wondering when this promise of personalized recommendations will actually be delivered.

In this post, we’re going to show you how to ask the right questions of your technology provider, to make an informed choice based on business considerations, not technical jargon. We’ll highlight some of the common risks and pitfalls, and conclude with a statement of what to expect from your technology provider.  (more…)

Personalized Web Content for Your Application

Wednesday, June 19th, 2013

Back in the early days of the Web, the Yahoo! Directory filled a huge gap in the ecosystem.

This portal helped us make sense of the Web. It organized content based on topics, connected those topics into a hierarchy to make sense of it all, and standardized the presentation of the content so that it was convenient and accessible.

But where can you find a portal that makes content from the Web accessible in your application? If you want to incorporate content from the Web into your app, let alone personalize it to the individual interests of your users, you’re undoubtedly confronting some daunting problems:

  • the content isn’t described in a way your application can understand;
  • the content isn’t organized in a way that matches your app; and
  • the content isn’t presented in a way that makes it easy to incorporate into your user experience.

In the sections that follow, we’re going to introduce you to a simple solution. Primal is like a personalized Web portal for your app. It’s a data service that makes it easy to incorporate Web content from sources you trust, tailored to the needs of each individual user of your application.

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How to Train Your Personalization Dragons

Wednesday, May 1st, 2013

I love this post by Joshua Fruhlinger, Please don’t personalize me. I know who I am. It captures a sentiment that many of us share (1) (2) (3). Joshua provides a wonderfully non-technical and simple summary:

I know who I am. I don’t need Facebook or Google or Microsoft or Apple or anyone else to collect data and tell me what I’m interested in. I’m pretty sure I know what I like and don’t like.

It’s a great point: Not only are big data approaches to personalization privacy-invading and offensive, they don’t work very well!

dragons-1There are much more direct and transparent ways to approach the opportunity of personalization. A system that allows you to be the master of your interests is self-empowering.
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A Personalized News App

Thursday, March 7th, 2013

In the sections that follow, we’ll show you how Primal can support your product development efforts by providing the data that describes the interests of individuals and finding the content that people will truly love!

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A Made-To-Order Web

Thursday, May 22nd, 2008

The Web suffers a fundamental problem. Search is a symptom of it. Surfing is a symptom of it. Even the website itself is a symptom of it. The problem is that content is organized for you, in advance. Pre-packaged content is like ordering off the menu at a restaurant. Sometimes it’s convenient, sometimes it’s just what you want, but many times, it’s a difficult choice to make. The Web wants to become made-to-order.

Search certainly helps. If I want to order off the menu, it’s great to have access to lots of restaurants and lots of menus. User-generated content is great, too, if you like to cook. But I don’t want to access content or create content, I want to consume it to get stuff done.

No one retrieves content for the sake of retrieving content; they have a deeper purpose in mind. “I need to create a report for my boss.” “I need to plan a trip for my family.” “I want to be entertained.” We’re task-oriented. All the intervening steps amount to the bill, tax, and gratuity. And since most tasks require us to visit many different sites, the overall cost is extraordinary.

A made-to-order Web would spare us these costs. If you’re ordering a specific task, much of the legwork can be delegated to machines. Computers are becoming increasingly adept at analytical tasks. They can break down content into bite-size pieces for our consumption. They are also capable of synthetic tasks, building the content back up into new forms. These types of analysis and synthesis tasks enable made-to-order.

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